mySupport Program

We know personal challenges can affect you at work and at home, and mySupport is here to help.

Sometimes it’s the little things—like finding a plumber to fix that leaky sink or a doggie day care to keep your new puppy occupied. Sometimes the issues are bigger and life-challenging, like struggles with depression, drug and alcohol misuse, or financial or legal problems. Whatever your need, mySupport is free, confidential, and at your service.

  • Mental Health Awareness in the Workplace
  • Anxiety Disorders & Mindfulness
  • Professional & Personal Perspectives on Depression
  • What We Think & Say Matters: How Unconscious Stigma May Worsen Our Mental Health
  • Mental Health Awareness & Ethnic Minority Clients

You can reach mySupport 24/7, 365 days a year, by phone at 443-997-7000 or by scheduling an appointment.

To schedule a mySupport presentation for your department, visit the Benefits and WorkLife Workshops and Webinars Request Page. For additional Benefits and WorkLife On-Demand Workshops and Webinars, click here.

For additional online resources, visit www.resourcesforliving.com, you will need to use the following:  Username: JHU   Password: JHU   There’s even a mobile app, giving you access to mySupport wherever you are.

Expand the content below to learn more about mySupport.

Mental Health Resources on Race & Racial Discussions

Who can help?
The university recognizes that the current events around racial justice, diversity, and civil unrest may be stressful for members of the Johns Hopkins Community, especially those with family and friends who are impacted. MySupport counselors are available to faculty, staff, and their household family members at 443-997-7000, option #2, 24/7/365 to assist with emotional support and daily life assistance.

What resources are available to me, my family, my co-workers, and my team?

  • Coping with civil unrest resources for employees & managers:
    • Click here for an employee toolkit with information on coping with distress from current events.
    • Click here for a manager toolkit with information on coping with distress from current events.
    • Click here for information on supporting your staff after distressing world events.
    • Click here for information on how to prevent burnout and fatigue for managers.
    • Click here for information on how to identify and support employees in difficult situations.
  • Civil Unrest Resources. Click here for response resources for civil unrest. These resources include hotlines to help those in need of crisis counseling, crisis response for parents, and resources specific to Major Metropolitan Cities such as Baltimore, Washington, D.C., Chicago, St. Louis, New York City, Boston, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, and Atlanta.
  • Racial Justice, Diversity and Mental Health Resources. Click here to receive additional information on advocacy organizations and black mental health resources.
  • Resources for Violence Against Asian Americans. Click here to receive additional information on advocacy organizations and resources for Asian American and Pacific Islander communities.
  • A Difficult But Necessary Conversation. Click here to learn how to navigate sensitive discussions about race and discrimination on myStrength. To create a myStrength login, use access code JHU ( for university employees) or JHHS (for health system employees).
  • Coping and Thriving Webinar Series. Click here to discover upcoming webinars to help you to cope and adjust to these overwhelming and difficult times. Topics include Talking to Kids about Race & Racism, Racial Justice Dialogue-Allyship & Advocacy, Navigating Working While/With Black, Cultural Differences & Mental Health Treatment, and Understanding & Overcoming Unconscious Bias.
  • Talking with kids about injustice. Click here for a guide on how to talk to young children about injustices that they may already be aware of. This document will help with talking to kids about injustice and offers suggestions on responding to injustice.
  • Additional Racial Discussion Resources. Click here for additional resources provided by the Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Health Equity. These resources include support resources for black individuals and communities such as Black Mental Health Alliance, Open Path Psychotherapy Collective, and Racial Trauma is Real information.
  • Tips for Managers in the Workplace. Click here for information on the three common missteps for managers to avoid and three ways for managers to take meaningful action.

How can I get emotional support for myself or a family member immediately?
To receive emotional support in the moment, call 443-997-7000, press option #2. You will be connected to a clinician in the moment, who will provide free, confidential, emotional support, and can help you to identify resources and next steps.

What if I am a manager concerned about a member of my team or my whole team related to race and emotional well-being?
Click here
for more information on consulting with a mySupport OnSite clinician, referring employees to mySupport directly, making a referral, informal referrals, and crisis response services.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month

About 1 in 5 Americans will experience a diagnosable mental disorder in any given year.  Chances are, someone you care about has dealt with a mental health concern at some point. Join the mySupport Onsite Clinical Team for weekly webinar series in the month of May to raise awareness and promote the message of good mental health for all. Make your mental wellbeing a priority. mySupport is here 24/7 for you, your household members, and children living away from home up to age 26. Give us a call (443-997-7000) for free, confidential help and referrals for any emotional or mental health concerns you may have.

Support for Teens, Young Adults and Their Loved Ones
  • Suicide Prevention for Guidebook for Parents: Adolescence is an exciting time. But it can be challenging too. We know that teenage mental health and suicide are very real problems. This guidebook will provide you with tools to help you support your child’s mental health.
  • Teens & Social Distancing: Social distancing is hard on everyone because we all need distance, personal space and connection. It’s especially hard on teenagers wo need freedom, more independence and time with peers. Click here to read more about helping your teen.
  • Here 4 U Online Peer Support Group Sessions
    • COVID-19 continues to test young adults in ways we could never have imagined. It’s a lot to deal with, and sometimes it can feel overwhelming. We want them to know they’re not alone.
    • As with other holidays and special occasions that have taken place during the pandemic, young adults may not be able to spend Valentine’s Day with the ones they love due to social distancing.
    • Here 4 U peer support group sessions will give young adults a safe space to talk about how they’re doing emotionally while being apart from friends and family. They’ll also hear how others are coping with COVID-19 and everything else.
    • Because Black young adults are experiencing an even greater set of challenges, given the systemic racism and injustice that continues to threaten our country, we’re offering some of these conversations exclusively for them.
    • We’re also providing sessions specifically for young adults from the LGBTQ+ community due to the stigma and discrimination they continue to encounter.
    • During these one-hour online discussions, young adults will have the chance to: connect with their peers to share how they’re dealing emotionally amid COVID-19, talk about social isolation and the virtual environment; and build coping skills and resilience.
    • Young adults aged 18-24 can register by choosing one of the dates and times listed on the Here 4 U site. Check back often to see when new sessions are added. The sessions dedicated specifically for young adults from the African- American/Black or LGBTQ community are noted. Spots are available on a first come, first served basis. Please register as soon as possible if you’re interested.
    • We want young adults to bring their thoughts, feelings and questions. And remember: you and all your household members can call us 24/7 for in-the-moment support and resources at 443-997-7000, Option #2 or schedule an appointment online by clicking here.
Learn to Cope and Thrive: Webinars Just For You

What is Coping and Thriving?

As crises arise, we have to change our way of coping and adjusting. Change can sometimes feel overwhelming and difficult to navigate. mySupport has partnered with the Family and Caregiving Programs & Wellness Programs to bring you the Coping & Thriving Webinar Series. Through webinars on various topics, we hope to provide tips, tricks, and techniques to help you cope, heal and thrive through the crises we face. These webinars are offered live, reoccurring, and on-demand.

Click here to learn more

Coping with COVID information, FAQ’s

Who can help?
The university recognizes that the situation with COVID-19 may be stressful for members of the Johns Hopkins Community, especially those with family and friends who are affected. MySupport counselors are available to faculty, staff, and their household family members at 443-997-7000, option #2, 24/7/365 to assist with emotional support and daily life assistance.

What resources are available to me, my family, my co-workers, and my team?

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19) Preparedness Guide. Click here to receive additional information on national health resources, emotional support resources, grocery & meal delivery apps, prescription delivery resources, financial assistance resources, temporary housing needs resources, and resources & articles for remote fitness & health.
  • Coping with COVID-19 Webinar Series. Click here to discover upcoming webinars to help you navigate during these challenges times. Topics include Staying CALM to cope during COVID-19, Challenges for parents during COVID-19, Ways to stay connected during COVID-19, and Ways to relieve stress during COVID-19.
  • Financial Webinar Series. Click here to sign up for two weekly webinar series. Topics include: Budgeting When Income Is Uncertain & Investment Strategies in Volatile Markets.
  • Coping with Coronavirus Fears. It’s normal to feel worried about safety when facing an unknown threat like the COVID-19 virus. Click here for articles on overcoming those fears, ways to stay connected while home, and more.
  • Ways to Stay CALM. Click here for an infographic that gives tips on how to stay calm. You can print for yourself or share with your family, friends, and co-workers.

What about the Calm app?
JHU students, faculty, and staff have free access to the Calm app through August 2020. Members of the JHU community started getting free premium access to the Calm app last year, and 4,000 users have taken advantage of its meditation instruction, sleep assistance, videos on mindful movement and stretching, and relaxing music. Current users can continue their free access uninterrupted. New users will need to create an account at calm.com/jhu and follow these steps:

  • Use an @jhu.edu or @jhmi.edu email to create the account
  • Click on the confirmation email that is sent to your inbox
  • Download the Calm app from Apple App storeor Google Play, or go to calm.com
  • Log in with the email you used to create the account and Calm Premium will be available for free

How can I get emotional support for myself or a family member immediately?
To receive emotional support in the moment, call 443-997-7000, press option #2. You will be connected to a clinician in the moment, who will provide free, confidential, emotional support, and can help you to identify resources and next steps.

If I do not need immediate assistance, what other options do I have for receiving emotional support?

  • Referrals to a licensed clinician in your community for you and your household family members. By calling 443-997-7000, option #2, you can request referrals to licensed clinicians in your area whom you or your family member may see for up to five visits per concern. During COVID-19, sessions are being conducted by televideo or telephonically.
  • Sessions with the mySupport on-site clinical team (previously known as the Faculty and Staff Assistance Program (FASAP)). You can fill out our request form to request an appointment or by calling 443-997-7000, option #2, you can request to be transferred to the on-site clinical team. This team is made up of licensed clinicians that are also employees of the Hopkins community. Sessions with the on-site team can usually be scheduled within a week, most of the times, sooner. During COVID-19, sessions are being conducted by televideo or telephonically.

What if I am a manager and I am concerned about an employee’s emotional well-being during COVID-19?

  • Consult with mySupport Clinician. The mySupport On-site Clinical Team is the best place to talk about your concerns so that you can receive professional guidance on how to proceed. To consult a mySupport on-site clinician, call 443-997-7000, option #2, 8:30a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. When you call, please clarify that you are a supervisor calling to consult about an employee concern. A member of the mySupport OnSite Clinical Team will hear your concerns and provide recommendations.
  • Refer Employee Directly to MySupport. Managers can direct employees to reach mySupport at 443-997-7000, option #2 or employees can fill out a form to request an appointment.

What if I am a manager and I am concerned about the emotional well-being of my team during COVID-19?
mySupport On-Site Clinical team offers crisis response services. Crisis Response Services available through mySupport, via televideo or telephonically, can help you and your department provide an appropriate response during the COVID-19 crisis and other difficult workplace events that may occur. mySupport provides the following services:

  • Consultations with managers and supervisors to plan a response to staff who are coping with this crisis
  • Staff briefings and tips for coping with the event
  • Small group interventions
  • Virtual outreach to provide initial support and psychological first aid
  • Same-day appointments for crisis victims
  • Individual assessment and referral for emotional problems related to this crisis
  • Virtual departmental briefings for supervisors and tips for supporting employees
  • Resource materials for individuals impacted by this crisis
Depression Awareness Resources

Who can help?
The university recognizes that employees and family members may be impacted by depression especially during this global pandemic. MySupport counselors are available to faculty, staff, and their household family members at 443-997-7000, option #2, 24/7/365 to assist with emotional support and daily life assistance.

What resources are available to me, my family, my co-workers, and my team?

  • Coping and Thriving Webinar Series: Click here to discover upcoming webinars to help you to cope and adjust to these overwhelming and difficult times. Topics include finding comfort beyond the comfort zone, recognizing depression, understanding and treating depression, etc.
  • MyStrength App. Click here to access the myStrength portal using one of the following access codes: JHHS or JHU. This app has a mood tracker and evidence-based modules for mood and anxiety management.
  • Articles, Videos, and Resources on Depression. Click here for additional depression resources. These resources include articles on depression, depression resource center videos, and information on the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA), Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), and other organizations.
  • Articles, Videos, and Resources on Suicide and How to Help Someone Who’s Having Suicidal Thoughts.  Click here for additional resources on suicide prevention. If you or someone you know is in crisis, you can reach out to mySupport or the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). This resource includes articles to help understand and prevent suicide, the suicide resource center, and additional national suicide resources.
  • Talk Saves Lives Training. Talk Saves Lives™ online tool is designed to help you understand suicide and know the warning signs. Then you can start the conversation. Click here to start the training.
  • Online Depression Screening:
    • Depression is more than feeling sad or blue. Real depression gets in the way of you being you. It can stem from family history, a life event, a health condition….or no reason you can understand. Whatever the cause, depression is treatable. And you’ve got support along your journey.
    • If you are ready to check in on how you are feeling, try the depression check. It’s just 10 simple questions to help tune in to your feelings. Click here to take the assessment.
    • Following the assessment, contact mySupport to connect with an on-site clinician by calling 443-997-7000, option #2 or scheduling here.

How can I get emotional support for myself or a family member immediately?
To receive emotional support in the moment, call 443-997-7000, press option #2. You will be connected to a clinician in the moment, who will provide free, confidential, emotional support, and can help you to identify resources and next steps.

What if I am a manager concerned about a member of my team or my whole team related to race and emotional well-being?
Click here for more information on consulting with a mySupport OnSite clinician, referring employees to mySupport directly, making a referral, informal referrals, and crisis response services.

Resources for Healthcare/Medical Personnel and their families

Coping with COVID-19 For Healthcare & Medical Personnel

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues we know that healthcare and medical personnel are working hard and may be in need of additional support. You’re a professional. But you’re also human. Dealing with adults and children who are sick- and scared-can create an enormous burden. It can lead to traumatic stress, similar to that of soldiers who’ve been in combat. When you, a family member, or a friend are suffering from traumatic stress you may see:

  •  Headaches, stomachaches, backaches and more
  • Changes in eating and sleeping patterns
  • Extreme worry and anxiety
  • Nightmares and flashbacks
  • Feelings of depression or irritability
  • Use of drugs or alcohol for self soothing

Health care and medical personnel should respect their stress signals. Recognizing stress symptoms and respecting the need to help yourself is important. For starters, de-fuse with some of the following steps:

  • Take a break during the day: Go outside, take some deep breaths, call a friend or do anything that soothes you
  • Take care of your own needs: Self-care is critical during this time. Spend time with your family, work out and minimize your news intake. Use your breaks to recharge your batteries.
  • Ask for help: The pressure of your job can really catch up with you. If you’re having trouble sleeping, eating, or regulating your stress level, get support.
    • MySupport is available to Johns Hopkins employees, 24/7/365 by calling 443-997-7000, option #2 or schedule an appointment with a counselor here.

Source: Aetna Resources For Living © 2019 Aetna, Inc.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Click here for information on Coping with COVID-19 for medical staff

Click here for access to the Health care workers’ mental health guide

Click here for information on healthcare workers and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Dealing with Election Stress & The Breach on the Capitol

Who can help?
The university recognizes that employees and family members may be dealing with today’s stresses.  MySupport counselors are available to faculty, staff, house staff, post-docs, and their household family members at 443-997-7000, option #2, 24/7/365 to assist with emotional support and daily life assistance. You can call us when you are having problems getting through day-to-day life, sleeplessness for two weeks or more, trouble focusing, changes in appetite, feeling irritable, or increased worrying or feelings of panic.

How do I care for myself during this stressful time?

Election season can be stressful. And this time it comes as we’re also dealing with the breaching at the Capitol, COVID-19, racial tensions, issues around children’s schooling, job and financial security and more. Is it any wonder people’s emotions are running high?

If you have been exposed to violence, you’ve gone through an event that may challenge your beliefs about the world. It is natural to be upset whether you’re directly or indirectly involved. You could feel shaken and confused. You may notice that you are fearful, sad, angry, worried, or have physical symptoms like stomach upset or pain in your chest- these are normal emotions, and reactions, and right now, you may feel them intensely. Or you may even feel numb? Why? it may be that life has never seemed so fragile. And perhaps you’ve never felt so vulnerable. You are not alone.  You may not be able to control the larger issues going on around you but you can control you and how you cope.

Remember:

It is okay to deal with your feelings. Here are some steps:

    • Accept them. If you are human, you’ve got feelings about what’s happening all around you.
    • Express them. If you’re sad and scared, cry or talk about it with a trusted friend. If you are about to blow up, walk away, listen to music or take deep breaths to calm down. If you need time alone, ask for it.
    • Explore them. You may want to get professional help to deal with your feelings. Reach out to mySupport. We are here for you.
  • Eat well. Be gentle on your stomach. Eat small, evenly spaced meals or snacks. And go for foods that are easy to digest.
  • Get rest. Try to get a healthy amount of sleep. Being well-rested helps you function better.
  • Move your body. Find ways to get some exercise. This can help reduce physical stress and help you think more clearly.
  • Be patient. People cope in their own ways and in their own time. So be patient- with yourself and others. Limit the use of alcohol or other drugs, unless prescribed by your doctor.
  • You can control your reactions: You can’t fix every problem or react to every stressor with the same level of emotion. That will simply wear you out. Turn yourself down a few notches to keep your reactions from overwhelming you.
  • You can control your actions. Make time to connect with friend and family every day. Limit the TV news if that gets you worked up. Get involved as a volunteer to help others. Remember to be grateful for the good people and things in your life.
  • You can reach out for help. You can call mySupport anytime, any day for more ways to cope and for in-the-moment support.

Source: Aetna Resources For Living, © 2019 Aetna, Inc.

What resources are available to me, my family, my co-workers, and my team?

  • Coping and Thriving Webinar Series: Click here to discover upcoming webinars to help you to cope and adjust to these overwhelming and difficult times.
  • MyStrength App. Click here to access the myStrength portal using one of the following access codes: JHHS or JHU. This app has a mood tracker and evidence-based modules for mood and anxiety management. There is also a module available on releasing fear.
  • Additional Resources.
    • 2020 Election Sanity Guide: Click here for a guide that will help you stay sane and engaged during the 2020 US Elections, without burning out. There’s something for everyone in this resource.
    • Eight Questions that can help you survive election stress: Click here to get tips on how to stay grounded during the 2020 US Election.

How can I get emotional support for myself or a family member immediately?
To receive emotional support in the moment, call 443-997-7000, press option #2. You will be connected to a clinician in the moment, who will provide free, confidential, emotional support, and can help you to identify resources and next steps.

What if I am a manager concerned about a member of my team or my whole team related to election stress and the breach on the Capitol?
Click here for more information on consulting with a mySupport OnSite clinician, referring employees to mySupport directly, making a referral, informal referrals, and crisis response services.

Emotional Support

Through mySupport, JHU employees and their household family members have free 24/7 access to confidential counseling and referral services for help with stress at work or at home, emotional distress, a difficult life transition, or other challenges. When you call mySupport, a clinician will listen, provide support, and help you identify resources and next steps. If you choose to arrange a televideo or in-person appointment, mySupport will provide referrals to licensed clinicians in your area. Your first five in-person counseling sessions are free and won’t require use of your insurance. You and your family members also can opt for an in-person appointment with a member of mySupport’s OnSite Clinical Care Team, located on various Johns Hopkins campuses.

Daily Life Assistance

Struggling to find that balance between work and home? Let us lighten your load. Through mySupport, you and your household family members have 24/7 telephone access to a daily life assistance counselor who can offer resources and referrals for child care, elder care, pet care, parenting issues—even household help, such as finding a contractor. mySupport’s online services also can help you find services and resources for prenatal care, adoption, emergency care, summer camps, school and college search, and other needs. And mySupport also offers phone and in-person legal services; financial services, such as help with budgeting, managing debt, and tax preparation; and identity theft resolution and consultation.